Dear Wendy
Dear Wendy

Friday Links

Here are a few things from around the web that may interest you:

Hint: It’s love. “This 75-Year Harvard Study Found the 1 Secret to Leading a Fulfilling Life”

In the New York Times’ first-ever Love issue, four authors beautifully recount times when love and travel intersected in their lives and readers share stories of loves found and lost on the road.

Thank women for O’Reilly’s downfall

“I am coming after you with everything I have,” O’Reilly told Emily Steel on the record in 2015. “You can take it as a threat.” Two years later, she took him down.

“Millennial women are ‘worried,’ ‘ashamed’ of out-earning boyfriends and husbands”

The Handmaid’s Tale Is a Warning to Conservative Women

“These essays about female ambition spotlight society’s tortured relationship to women who want to achieve—and our own tortured relationship to ourselves”

Thank you to those who submitted links for me to include. If you see something around the web you think DW readers would appreciate, please send me a link to wendy@dearwendy.com and, if it’s a fit, I’ll include it in Friday’s round-up. Thanks!

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23 comments… add one
  • avatar

    RedRoverRedRover April 21, 2017, 8:26 am

    Does anyone else feel like feminism is going backwards? I do. It seems like Gen X might be the last feminist generation.

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      Kate April 21, 2017, 8:34 am

      Yes.

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      TheHizzy April 21, 2017, 8:59 am

      It shocks me ho w many of my fellow Gen Y ladies aren’t for women’s rights because “feminism doesn’t effect them” Well it does but we don’t have struggles to the degree as generations before.

      I still see the struggle being in male dominated fields but I was also raised to not cause a stir. It’s an internal struggle.

      I’m probably the most outspoken of my friends, and whenever we do get into a women’s rights debate I can see how uncomfortable it makes people. It’s frustrating.

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      • Cleopatra Jones

        Cleopatra Jones April 21, 2017, 10:08 am

        Yeah but the same can be said for the Civil Rights Movement. I know plenty of black people who don’t even realize that their parents or grandparents weren’t allowed to vote in a lot of places in the U.S.
        That’s just 1 or 2 generations ago, so people definitely ‘forget’ the struggle when they aren’t necessarily struggling themselves to get the same opportunities.

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        Kate April 21, 2017, 10:27 am

        I think that’s true, Cleopatra. The other thing with feminism, like I’ve said before, is I think it’s becoming more and more apparent to millennial women that “having it all” is actually bullshit, so theyre not fighting so hard for the ability to have impressive, high-paying, full-time jobs AND be parents. It’s just not worth it, because society makes it such a freaking goat-rope.

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        RedRoverRedRover April 21, 2017, 10:40 am

        @CJ, but is it becoming a common attitude for blacks to say “we’re already equal, civil rights activists are trying to make black people superior to whites”? Because that’s becoming all too common for young women to say about feminism. And of course an even larger number of young men agree.

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      • Cleopatra Jones

        Cleopatra Jones April 22, 2017, 6:03 pm

        @RedRover,
        I think for black people it’s expressed differently but with the same underlying sentiment. I see it more often with black people who have ‘made it’ (financially stable careers, and college educated). There’s either a dissociation from other black people OR apathy about the lack of rights for minorities.

        Also, schools do a horrible job of teaching the history of women and minorities in the U.S., so I feel that people are apathetic because they have no knowledge of the past.

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  • avatar

    Kate April 21, 2017, 8:34 am

    I’m so excited about the Handmaid’s Tale show coming up! I don’t watch any shows (except when ANTM was on, and I did recently catch up on Orange is the New Black), and we don’t have Hulu, but I’m definitely watching this. I read the book at age 14 or 15 and definitely was like “holy shit, ” but re-reading it now, I’m picking up on sooooo much more. While parts of it feel a bit dated, since it was written in the 80s before most of the technology we have today, most of it feels horrifyingly right on. I think a lot of people younger than me might have missed out on reading this book because it came out so long ago, but it’s 100% worth a read now.

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      RedRoverRedRover April 21, 2017, 8:36 am

      We had to read it in highschool, and it was amazing. I think a lot of Canadian highschools cover it because we always have a section on Canadian authors, and of course Margaret Atwood is one of our best. I hope it’s still on the curriculum.

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        Kate April 21, 2017, 8:37 am

        I don’t think we read it in school. It takes place in Cambridge, MA, though!

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        RedRoverRedRover April 21, 2017, 8:44 am

        Does it? I haven’t read it in awhile. I should pull it out and read it before the show starts though, so it’s fresh in my mind. It’s a quick read, if I recall. Still halfway through American Gods, I wanted to reread it before its show starts too. And GoT is coming back, it’s going to be a great few months for TV!

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        Kate April 21, 2017, 8:48 am

        Yeah, they’re in Harvard Square. I think she went to Radcliffe so she knows the area. When she describes the layout, I’m like oh yeah. It has to take place in the US rather than Canada because, you know, conservative extremism.

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        RedRoverRedRover April 21, 2017, 9:00 am

        Hahahah when I read it as a teen I was like “how come she set it in the US if she’s Canadian?”. But as I got older I realized. It doesn’t really fit the mentality here, it wouldn’t have the same punch as it does being set in the US. We don’t have that hardcore religious streak the same way. It’s still here a bit, but not nearly so outspoken, and definitely not as powerful.

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    • Copa

      Copa April 21, 2017, 9:47 am

      I wasn’t even aware of this book until right now, so I do feel I missed out on it — but I’m adding to my list!

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      • honeybeenicki

        honeybeenicki April 21, 2017, 11:00 am

        Copa – I didn’t read it until last year. It wasn’t required for me in HS or anything. I have now read it twice and plan to re-read before watching it 🙂

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    • Dear Wendy

      Dear Wendy April 21, 2017, 11:12 am

      I haven’t read it yet! All the copies at the library have been checked out for months, and I’ve been on a waiting list about that long. Maybe I should just buy a copy?

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    • avatar

      MissDre April 21, 2017, 11:13 am

      I thought I read this in high school but turns out it was Alias Grace, another Atwood novel. I didn’t like Alias Grace all that much. Maybe The Handmaid’s Tale is better?

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  • MaterialsGirl

    MaterialsGirl April 21, 2017, 10:15 am

    I read the book at the beginning of the year and used many quotes for my protest signs in the Women’s March! Hooray for literature! Hooray for feminism!

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  • bittergaymark

    Bittergaymark April 21, 2017, 11:34 am

    Downfall? He now get 25 Million Dollars for NOT working. Some fall from grace. 😳

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