Dear Wendy
Dear Wendy

Friday Links, June 14

Here are a few things from around the web that may interest you:

How to cope when you’re a female breadwinner [via HuffPo]

“What One Editor Learned From Reading About Hundreds of Strangers’ Sex Lives” [via XXFactor]

“Tennessee judge issues dress code for female lawyers” [via USAToday]

After every wedding, there is a dear friend who will immediately disappear from your life. And that’s OK. [via Slate]

Check out this interview with yours truly. [via ShopAtHome.com]

“My boyfriend, the sex addict” [via Salon]

“We are the lamest generation!” [via Salon]

Thank you to those who submitted links for me to include. If you see something around the web you think DW readers would appreciate, please send me a link to wendy@dearwendy.com and if it’s a fit, I’ll include it in Friday’s round-up. Thanks!

You can follow me on Facebook here and sign up for my weekly newsletter here.

65 comments… add one
  • Classic

    Classic June 14, 2013, 1:16 pm

    Great interview, Wendy! Brings back good memories of some of the more amazing letters, gives nice details and background, and leaves you laughing at the last line 🙂

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  • Copa

    Copa June 14, 2013, 1:24 pm

    I was curious to read the article about the dress code for female lawyers because one time, in my past life (my law school years), I wore a black pant suit with a red shirt underneath. I was reprimanded by a judge for not wearing a SKIRT suit, and told that my red shirt was “too flashy” even though my outfit was appropriately conservative for the occasion. I was expecting the article to be something along the lines of that; I’m glad it wasn’t and was surprised to read that an attorney showed up to court in sweats and a blouse. No matter your profession, I think that’s pretty embarrassing. I work in a super casual office now that I’ve left my “past life” behind me — like, it’s so casual that we have a framed “company mission statement” written when the company was founded in the 90s that specifically makes mention of a casual atmosphere — and I’d still be shocked to see anyone in sweats.

    All of that said, I’m still kind of opposed to a dress code specifically for female attorneys. Surely there are men out there who are making all kinds of fashion faux pas of their own?

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    • avatar

      lets_be_honest June 14, 2013, 1:28 pm

      I liked the article too, even though I thought I would disagree with it, which I didn’t.

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    • avatar

      GatorGirl June 14, 2013, 1:41 pm

      I was a little disappointed it was woman centric but there were a few mentions of men. All of the outfits the described where completely out of line, IMO. I 110% think miniskirts and sleeveless tops (AND sweatpants) are inappropriate for the courtroom. But I think those things are inappropriate in any work setting (okay not any but most) even a business casual office. I also think shorts are not appropriate in a business casual environment (for male or female) but I might be the only one.

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      • Copa

        Copa June 14, 2013, 1:53 pm

        I think targetting women over men when it comes to inappropriate professional attire is sometimes easier because women have more fashion options in the first place.

        I think shorts are inappropriate, too. Women in my office go sleeveless during the summers if they want to (even the ones with sleeve tattoos!), but shorts would surprise me. But, I think my company also trusts we all know how to dress up when we need to.

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      • avatar

        bethany June 14, 2013, 2:04 pm

        I am wearing a sleeveless top at work as we speak!
        🙂

        But no spaghetti straps.

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      • avatar

        lets_be_honest June 14, 2013, 2:05 pm

        Right, what’s a guy going to wear to court that is so inappropriate? An ill-fitting suit? A polo with khakis?

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      • avatar

        Guy Friday June 14, 2013, 2:25 pm

        In one case here, flip-flops, a t-shirt with a band’s name on it, and shorts. No tie. No coat. I can MAYBE understand that if it’s an emergency hearing on a Sunday and you had to be there ASAP (it happens occasionally), but I have a backup suit, several ties, dress shoes, and a sport coat sitting in my filing cabinet/mini-closet next to my desk. You don’t have to look like a million bucks to look professional.

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      • avatar

        lets_be_honest June 14, 2013, 2:28 pm

        I feel like that’s a different situation, and a judge would hopefully be understanding on a Sunday for an emergency and you explain yourself to her/him. I can’t think of any time I’ve seen a male attorney dressed totally inappropriately at court. I can certainly think of times where I thought a female attorney was though.

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      • avatar

        Guy Friday June 14, 2013, 2:34 pm

        Oh, no, absolutely. I didn’t mean to imply that that attorney got in trouble or anything for a Sunday emergency thing, though again unless it’s REALLY an emergency I’d at least throw on jeans or khakis and maybe change my shirt. But going in to court on a Tuesday afternoon dressed like that (which is when this happened)? No good reason. None at all. If you’re too busy to show up dressed nicely, get someone to cover for you, or call the court and own up to it.

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      • avatar

        lets_be_honest June 14, 2013, 2:37 pm

        I loved your comment on this below. Agree 100%

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      • avatar

        GatorGirl June 14, 2013, 2:12 pm

        Women are definitely easier to target because the range of women’s clothes is soooo much broader. (Same thing when we had the school age kids clothes conversation- girls are “targeted’ because there is more opportunity for variety.) Anyhoo, I don’t really wear tank tops anyways so maybe it’s just a personal preference thing. I just don’t like armpits hanging out.

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      • avatar

        lets_be_honest June 14, 2013, 2:13 pm

        Your armpits hang? 😉

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      • avatar

        GatorGirl June 14, 2013, 2:16 pm

        Tehe.

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      • avatar

        kerrycontrary June 14, 2013, 1:54 pm

        No, you aren’t the only one on the shorts thing. I work in a casual office (but business casual when clients are here), and you can’t wear shorts.

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    • avatar

      Guy Friday June 14, 2013, 2:24 pm

      I think you missed the part in the story where the judge mentioned that he did this to hold female attorneys to the same standard male attorneys are held to. I mean, it’s an article about the proposed female dress code, so it’s not going to talk much about men.

      In my county, there are local court rules that require a specific dress code for male and female lawyers, and, honestly, most counties in the US have them. It varies from county to county, but nothing is wrong with that. This is literally the language from the Local Court Rules here:
      “Professional attire means that men will wear coats and ties and women will wear dresses, suits or pantsuits. Each Judge and Court Commissioner may make exceptions to these rules as they think appropriate.”
      In reality, judges aren’t generally particular if you deviate slightly from that; I have female colleagues who wear a nice blouse and dress pants and are fine, and I’ve been known to wear khakis and sneakers along with a coat and tie. But I know of other lawyers who can’t even be bothered to put a tie on to show up for court, and that sweatpants comment isn’t a lie; I’ve seen lawyers in there in sweatpants or shorts and a t-shirt. Sorry, but you’re a freaking lawyer; show some respect for your clients and the profession by dressing as if you take this seriously. This particularly pisses me off in criminal defense; your client could be sent away for years, if not DECADES; perhaps, if it’s not too much trouble, you can maybe throw a sport coat on? Maybe wear a skirt long enough not to flash everyone when you sit down?

      It’s one thing if you’re a client in court; I always tell my clients to wear clothes that are clearly taken care of, because even a shirt and a pair of jeans is nice if you can tell it’s been ironed or folded neatly before wearing. But the ONLY time I’ve ever shown up in court in anything less than khakis was a situation where one of my coworkers blew off a court date and I ran down there in jeans and a polo, and even then I threw a coat and tie over it. The judge understood, but I was self-conscious of how ridiculous I looked the WHOLE. DAMN. TIME.

      Sorry, but this subject pisses me off. The fact that it even needs to be told to attorneys that they should look professional is disgusting to me. If you can’t afford to buy a sport coat, a tie, and a nice pair of pants to wear to court, rethink your profession. Seriously. I can’t imagine one other lawyer on this forum suggest he or she would ever go to court dressed like some of these attorneys.

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      • Copa

        Copa June 14, 2013, 2:41 pm

        I’m not saying there shouldn’t be a dress code. I’m just saying that I doubt women are the only ones showing up to court dressed like slobs.

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      • avatar

        Guy Friday June 14, 2013, 2:54 pm

        And I’m not disputing that at all. But you’re missing the point of the article:

        “But I found that county judges here weren’t holding women to the same standard as men”
        “Attorney Lisa Eischeid said Judge Taylor is an equal opportunity wardrobe conservative. She recalls one instance where he found a male attorney in contempt of court for appearing without a blazer. Taylor confirmed the story, adding that he also made the attorney donate to charity. ”

        That shows that there is a standard for men, i.e., a dress code. Which there is, as well as one for women. I’ll concede that it’s somewhat vague; it says “Counsel shall be properly attired when attending Court which shall include proceedings which may appear less formal such as name changes or probate matters.” Just because the article talks about his addressing women doesn’t mean he hasn’t addressed it to men as well.

        Suggesting that this is in any way — even a tiny eensy weensy bit — an affront to women is ridiculous. And you know how I know it is? Because the female attorneys that practice in that county responded with a collective shrug. At best, one was “slightly offended”, but then again she also was under the impression that there was a mandatory requirement of pantyhose, which there was not.

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      • Copa

        Copa June 14, 2013, 3:31 pm

        I didn’t say or suggest it was offensive. If you read my original comment, I was expecting it to be based on my own crappy experience working for a sexity, stodgy judge, but I said that the article wasn’t what I was expecting and I was glad for that. Do I dislike when how women dress is deemed newsworthy? Yes; it irritates me. But my point (maybe not clearly stated?) is that I don’t think there should be a drses code for women because I don’t think there should be gender-specific dress codes. I think there should be one dress code across the board to dress like a professional and that people should “get” what that does or does not entail based on profession, occasion, and location.

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      • avatar

        Guy Friday June 14, 2013, 3:40 pm

        “I think there should be one dress code across the board to dress like a professional and that people should “get” what that does or does not entail based on profession, occasion, and location.”

        Ok. I did misinterpret your comment. I’ll agree with that point. But I also think the article is more about a letter REMINDING them about the dress code and trying to clarify (i.e., a “Ok, so we’ll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you don’t know what “properly attired” means, so here’s some thoughts.”) rather than a formal code.

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      • avatar

        GatorGirl June 14, 2013, 3:41 pm

        I of course don’t think women should be targeted or have a more strict dress code, but some things are gender specific. Like having your bra strap showing or the length of a skirt (I’m assuming few men wear skirts, which is my experience) or the height of a heel. It’s sort of impossible to disregard gender because it’s part of the core of a person and it directly affects how they clothe themselves.

        (And it would be lovely if everyone just “got” what was appropriate but it’s been proven time and time again that that just doesn’t happen.)

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      • Copa

        Copa June 14, 2013, 4:17 pm

        True. But can you imagine an article being written about men who sagged their pants in court? (That’s the only thing I can think of off the top of my head that men do that women don’t.) And how, by doing so, they weren’t being held to the same standards as their women counterparts? I think that’s what aggravates me about reading stuff like this; I just can’t imagine it being newsworthy.

        (Side note: my boyfriend isn’t a lawyer but is a manager for a very big company. He wears a suit every day and sags his dress pants. Sigh.)

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      • avatar

        GatorGirl June 14, 2013, 4:22 pm

        I could maybe see it getting published. And the author (or judge?) talks about guys quite a few times in the article. Also, to some degree I think it’s “easier” to say “Hey Joe, pull your pants up” (coming from a male or female) then to say “Sally you need to put a cardigan on because your bra straps are showing” (especially from a male, but it wouldn’t come across good from a female either). There is way more room for inappropriate dress in women than men, IMO.

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      • Copa

        Copa June 14, 2013, 4:34 pm

        See, I guess I can’t see an article about that because I actually asked my boyfriend if he’s ever been called out on it. Nope. He said nobody cares; they don’t pay attention to how he dresses, they just care that he has the personality his job requires.

        I do agree there is more room for women to dress inappropriately, but I also people are more likely to focus on a woman’s clothes in the first place.

        But by now I recognize that I’m projecting larger issues onto the article. Haha.

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      • Copa

        Copa June 14, 2013, 2:53 pm

        I also think that if women showed up in khakis and sneakers, they’d get shit for doing so.

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      • avatar

        Guy Friday June 14, 2013, 2:57 pm

        They certainly don’t in my county, or in the other 5 or 6 counties I’ve appeared in. In fact, I’ve never heard of a single attorney held in contempt of court for their footwear, unless we’re talking flip-flops. Khakis are perfectly acceptable when paired with a nice shirt/blouse/whatever. And, frankly, no attorney should consider wearing something to court that would look inappropriate or unprofessional. You never know when potential clients might be watching you in court and decide to hire you as a result; it’s happened to me any number of times.

        Let me be clear: when I said I go to court in khakis and sneakers, it’s when there’s a last minute hearing or when I KNOW that I’ll be either getting a date off the record or appearing on the record for less than 3 minutes. If I think I’m going to have to sit or do anything substantive, it’s a suit and tie.

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  • avatar

    rachel June 14, 2013, 1:37 pm

    Wendy, I love the dress you’re wearing in the interview photo!

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    • Dear Wendy

      Wendy June 14, 2013, 3:13 pm

      Thanks! I got that on Bluefly three or four years ago.

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  • Classic

    Classic June 14, 2013, 1:56 pm

    OK I really liked the “lamest generation” article because that just really described the millennials that I know best, including my son and his friends. These are just such earnest, caring, cautious, kind-hearted young people who are always trying so hard to always do the right thing.

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    • Fabelle

      Fabelle June 14, 2013, 2:10 pm

      I looove that article, & I love Jennifer Wright (the author) from her articles over at TheGloss.com. I’m happy somebody submitted it here!

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    • avatar

      csp June 14, 2013, 3:38 pm

      I liked it too. Though, I was hanging out with my youngest cousins last weekend and it made me sad that they weren’t giving thier parents “enough trouble.” Like they were too cautious.

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  • avatar

    lets_be_honest June 14, 2013, 1:58 pm

    So this is pretty unrelated, but I bought a Girl’s Life magazine for the kiddo and in it (aside from WAY too much focus on boys which was disappointing) is an advice column called Ask Carol or something. The advice SUCKED. All boy-centric and nothing about being yourself. It was just sad, especially since this is the only girl’s mag out there that isn’t all about teen heartthrobs. Anyway, I guess this is me begging Wendy to do a tween advice column. Pleeaassee. Imagine how beneficial your advice would be to younger girls? Get them started on the right path early, rather than have to break them down as they age to reteach them that life isn’t all about boys and not being yourself.

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    • Copa

      Copa June 14, 2013, 2:01 pm

      I don’t have a kid but still think this is an awesome idea!

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      • avatar

        lets_be_honest June 14, 2013, 2:06 pm

        The only con I’m imagining is that Wendy will have less adult women to give advice to because they won’t need it if she gives it to them young 🙂

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      GatorGirl June 14, 2013, 2:10 pm

      Every now and then I pick up one of my sister’s Seventeen magazines and they are SO boy centric. How to get a BF, how to win your crush over, 5 things you can do to make boys like you, etc etc. makes me sad.

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    • avatar

      Zepp June 16, 2013, 11:38 am

      American Girl is a fabulous magazine for girls that has nothing to do with boys!

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      • avatar

        lets_be_honest June 17, 2013, 12:56 pm

        Zepp, Thanks! I’m realizing now that when I grabbed Girls Life, I was thinking it was American Girl actually. I do like the mag a lot more. Anyway, thanks again.

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  • mylaray

    mylaray June 14, 2013, 2:02 pm

    I’ve been thinking about the whole breadwinner thing recently. Since I grew up with a mom who refused to work and make money, I always knew I wanted to work hard and wanted to be the breadwinner. And now, as my boyfriend and I are getting joint bank accounts, moving in and starting to merge everything, it does scare me in a sense. I’ll always make more than my boyfriend and while I’m okay with it now, it’s hard to tell if I will be okay with it in 10 years, 20 years. Those tips were helpful and came at a good time. I suppose I’m always worried about resentment in some way since it’s such a relationship killer.

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  • avatar

    A La Mode June 14, 2013, 2:16 pm

    I guess something is flying right over my head with the Breadwinner article. Why is it a concern that women resent their husbands if the wife makes more money, but has always been taboo for husbands to resent their wives when the husband is the breadwinner?

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  • avatar

    lemongrass June 14, 2013, 2:21 pm

    They misspelled your name…boo!

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  • avatar

    A La Mode June 14, 2013, 2:21 pm

    As for the article about friends disappearing after a wedding, I am one of those disappearing friends. Same goes for when people have a baby. I would not disappear on someone if they put effort into maintaining our friendship, or if they didn’t let a Big Event dominate every conversation they had with me. Unfortunately, I have not yet had a friend get married or have a baby who has become exceedingly self-centered and single-minded. This may be because I’m in my early 20s. But frankly, I have no interest in maintaining a friendship with someone when their baby or spouse is a permanent attachment at the hip, with someone who never initiates conversations or who only has one thing to talk about, or with someone who looks down on me for still being single and childless.

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    • mandalee

      mandalee June 14, 2013, 2:37 pm

      See I understand disappearing if your friend is self-centered or obsessed solely with their spouse/baby/etc, but I’ve experienced the ghosting friend thing after the wedding and to my knowledge I haven’t done any of those things! I don’t get people who go through a new phase of life whether it’s parenthood or marriage and suddenly look down at people. I mean to me- it’s silly. Granted it’s nice to have some friends that can relate to your circumstance but your close friends don’t stop being important people because you got a ring all of a sudden!

      In my situation, I have one friend who was a bridesmaid who I have seen only once in the two years since my wedding and our phone calls are getting less and less frequent and it bothers me. Granted the friend is long distance and in graduate school, so I’m sure there’s plenty of reasons why we’ve fallen slightly out of touch that may not be permanent, but it still makes me nervous because she was one of my best friends for a long time. I’d hate to look back on my wedding and ask “I wonder what ever happened to so-and-so?”

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      • avatar

        lets_be_honest June 14, 2013, 2:39 pm

        I think maybe its coincidental too. Like as I’ve gotten older, the keeping in touch with friends as much as I used to has definitely dwindled. People have just gotten busier and talk less because of it.

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        A La Mode June 14, 2013, 2:43 pm

        One thing that distanced me a lot from some people after they got married or became parents is that we no longer had the same things to talk about. I’m already one of those people who prefers to talk about world news, politics, or something other than the minutiae of life, but I am perfectly happy to hear about their day, a dramatic moment, or troubles my friends want to talk about. Once they get married, though, what on Earth do we have in common, unless they want to talk about something other than themselves? No, I’m not going to be able to understand the ramifications of marriage upon relationship troubles, and thus will be unable to engage in a conversation about it. I have zero interest in hearing about how someone else’s baby’s eyes seem to be developing better focus, or how potty training is going. So far, I haven’t been friends with anyone whose life, and conversation topics, haven’t drastically changed after a baby or spouse enters their life. And also, it’s remarkably difficult to see these people anymore. I have to ask them a week in advance. Then I have to reconfirm a day in advance. Then I have to go to someplace that their spouse/baby can go to, or I go to their house where they are distracted by spouse/baby/messes/etc. It just doesn’t work 🙁

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        rachel June 14, 2013, 2:48 pm

        My boyfriend has invented a “3 year rule” with his friends who have kids. They have 3 years from when the kid is born to be totally obsessed with the baby and not want to talk about anything else (because really they SHOULD be focusing largely on the baby), and past 3 years he’ll call them on it, or choose not to talk to them, haha.

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      • mandalee

        mandalee June 14, 2013, 3:10 pm

        Haha I love your boyfriend’s rule! I think three years is a great standard. My friend I mentioned below is currently on year two, and I’m hoping we turn a corner soon and I can get through a lunch without talking about potty training. Just one bathroom talk-free meal is all I ask.

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      • Lady_Red

        Red_Lady June 14, 2013, 3:11 pm

        I think I’ll use that rule. I have a good friend that has been really hard to get a hold of lately, and I was looking at my wedding photos the other day (she was in the bridal party), and I got sad because I’m kind of doubting that she’ll even be in my life years down the road. I even have a picture from her wedding up on my wall – I was her MOH. It makes me sad that I don’t get to see her anymore, especially since my other friends that recently became parents still make an effort to get together or talk on the phone or even just text. But, maybe I just have to wait another year and a half? I think I can do that.

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        lemongrass June 14, 2013, 2:52 pm

        Thats life. I make an effort to keep in touch with my old friends but it is hard. I also make a point of asking about whats going on in their lives but it goes both ways. If one of my single childless friends told me they had zero interest in hearing about my baby then our friendship would die. Right now my baby is my entire life. It has to be, it’s 24/7 work. I’m sure in a few years when it’s not so intense there will be more going on in my life but right now there isn’t. What I’m getting at is that if you want your friendships to continue then your friend’s should ask about your life but you should also ask about theirs.

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      • mandalee

        mandalee June 14, 2013, 3:07 pm

        Yeah, I don’t understand your married non-children friends. I mean my interests and ability to hold a conversation about something other than my husband didn’t just stop. Who can honestly talk about their spouse that much? Does everything just bounce about to the spouse? “Oh, you ate at this restaurant. Let me tell you about the time I went there with the hubby”. lol

        However, I think parents slip into somewhat of a cocoon when it comes to child rearing. I have a friend who I love dearly and whose child I love dearly, but she bores me to no end. All she does is complain and obsess over her child, and I have a very high tolerance for child talk, as I worked in early childhood for years and can tell poop stories with the best of them, but she drains me. I understand that children up-end your life and change your priorities but I’ve come in contact with enough parents to know that after the first few years, you can still be a mother and a person with interests, hobbies, etc.

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        bethany June 14, 2013, 3:11 pm

        One of my best friends is pregnant with baby #2, and I’m blown away by what a great friend she has been since she became a mother. I love her daughter. I love spending time with her and I love hearing about every little thing she does. Despite my interest in the babies, my friend makes it a point to spend time one on one with me where she asks me about my life, and I ask her about her life outside of children, because, even though she’s a mom, she still has other stuff going on in her life.

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        GatorGirl June 14, 2013, 3:44 pm

        Yeah, my BFF who has a 16 week old has been a better and more engaged friend since she found out she was pregnant and gave birth. And I love hearing about her baby. I guess we just lucked out with friends who are awesome?

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        bethany June 14, 2013, 3:53 pm

        I would’t be friends with her if she wasn’t awesome 🙂

        I only hope that if I have kids one day, I can live up to the example she’s set for me. She set the bar really, really high!

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    • avatar

      Sue Jones June 14, 2013, 10:43 pm

      I remember that when I got pregnant, all of a sudden my friends who had constant relationship drama were exhausting for me to be around and I really did not want to hear about it. To me THEY seemed to be the self-centered ones… but I think that hormones really do a number on you. Before marriage and kids I also felt that my married with kids friends sort of got self involved, but it is really hard to do once the kids come because they require so much attention.

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  • paperheart

    paperheart June 14, 2013, 2:24 pm

    So this is off-topic, but where has @theattack been? I haven’t seen her around here lately.

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    • avatar

      GatorGirl June 14, 2013, 2:33 pm

      She has been posting thing on FB. I think she’s out of town.

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    • Fabelle

      Fabelle June 14, 2013, 2:35 pm

      I was wondering, too!

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    • theattack

      theattack June 15, 2013, 9:30 pm

      Aww, I’m so glad someone noticed my absence! That makes me feel really special. 🙂 I was out of town on a business trip and staying at a university where they refused to give us the Wifi password. Hard times.

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  • Miel

    Miel June 14, 2013, 2:42 pm

    The women breadwinner article sounded weird to me. I felt like I was reading about wife with chronically ill, handicaped, dependent, or depressed, unemployed husband. Except if breadwinner means only “the woman provides 95% and the men 5%”, I have a hard time thinking that a “40%-60%” or “25%-75%” distribution would cause so much tension.

    Is it really because we’re still attached to the traditional roles in a marriage ? I don’t get why a woman making more than her husband is such a big deal. If they manage their finance in a harmonious way, what’s the problem ? Are there advice on “how to deal when your husband is the breadwinner” too ?

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    • avatar

      titian June 14, 2013, 3:16 pm

      Wouldn’t it be great if it wasn’t a big deal? This is strictly anecdotal but I work and live in a country with a very high concentration of professionals (men and women) and very few of my couple friends include two professionals (based on the context of the article). Generally the men are lawyers/accountants/IT professionals and the women study, or stay at home or have clerical jobs.

      And almost all of my single professional female friends feel like our options are somewhat lacking.

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    • katie

      katie June 14, 2013, 3:24 pm

      yes, unfortunately it is still such a big deal that a woman makes more then her man. its sad, but there you go.

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  • Fabelle

    Fabelle June 14, 2013, 2:44 pm

    Oh god, another Salon article with a horribly wrong tone (the sex addict one). It sounds like he ~basically~ tampered his desires to be with the writer, so I don’t think “sex addict” is the correct term to apply. They were just incredibly mis-matched.

    I “dated” (he was a long-term FWB, but for simplicity, I’ll say dated) someone like the dude in that article, who was into watching, & also male/male/female threesomes. He suggested it to multiple times, but since I was always on the fence (I’m more comfortable with male/female/female stuff), it never happened. Do I think he’s a sex addict? No. Some people just like group sex.

    TMI, sorry. Too long, didn’t read version: being into group sex doesn’t mean you’re a sex addict.

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  • avatar

    AliceInDairyland June 14, 2013, 1:58 pm

    Guys, guys:

    You are welcome.

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    • avatar

      SpaceySteph June 16, 2013, 6:49 pm

      Just discovered that yesterday… so awesome!

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  • avatar

    Taylor June 14, 2013, 3:17 pm

    Nice interview Wendy! Loved the shout out to Tom and Lorenzo. I am addicted to their posts, particularly the MM style ones. Also, just got the husband the bitters you suggested on the wedding post as a 1st anniversary gift…I think he is going to love them.

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