Dear Wendy
Dear Wendy

Friday Links, March 29

Here are a few things from around the web that may interest you:

“The Case for Getting Married Young” [via The Atlantic]

“Feminism’s Tipping Point: Who Wins from Leaning in?” [via Dissent Magazine]

“STD dating websites are on the rise” [via USA Today]

“Is Pinterest Ruining Weddings?” [via HuffPo]

“Jon Hamm Is Being Treated Like an Actress. He Hates It” [via XXFactor]

According to a new study in the American Sociological Review “Guys Who Do Housework Get Less Sex” (Hey, I just report this stuff…)[via Slate]

This guy spent $45,000 on the “perfect proposal” (She said yes) [via NYPost]

Thank you to those who submitted links for me to include. If you see something around the web you think DW readers would appreciate, please send me a link to wendy@dearwendy.com and if it’s a fit, I’ll include it in Friday’s round-up. Thanks!

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53 comments… add one
  • katie

    katie March 29, 2013, 12:24 pm

    the marrying young article is very interesting! i love the “capstone vs. cornerstone” thought. i actually dont think that doing it as a “capstone” is a good thing. like, whats left? if you put off marriage until everything is “perfect”, what does your marriage entail? it sounds boring to me, to be honest.

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    • katie

      katie March 29, 2013, 12:34 pm

      also: YES pinterest is ruining weddings.

      i would have more time to have sex if i didnt have to do some much housework, so i call bullshit on that study.

      big huge proposals are sad and lame and i wish they werent becoming a thing.

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      • avatar

        SpaceySteph March 29, 2013, 1:58 pm

        Re: the housework…
        I bought a house when I was single and so I had to do all those so-called “man” tasks like yard work and bill paying PLUS all the so-called “lady” tasks. Now that I’m married my husband does some of the chores- yard work, handy-man stuff, and also dishes. He’s an A++ dishwasher and I hate doing dishes with a burning fire and would put everything imaginable into the dishwasher if it would get me out of having to wash.
        If he quit washing the dishes, I guarantee he would get less sex.

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  • avatar

    *HmC* March 29, 2013, 12:31 pm

    I thought the marrying young article was interesting also, and I like that this type of information is starting to spread. As I’ve said on here before, the current acceptable timeline for marriage (late twenties/early thirties, finish school first) restricts many people, especially women, almost more than the old marry at 18 model. There are benefits to waiting and maturing, but I think that just moving the small time frame to a different age carries its own set of problems, as the article pointed out. At 28 people tell you you’re too young, then at 32 you are too old and there must be something wrong with you and all the good ones are snatched up. Wtf?!

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    • katie

      katie March 29, 2013, 12:35 pm

      i think we should just require people to mature earlier, that would solve everything, right?

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      • avatar

        *HmC* March 29, 2013, 12:41 pm

        Seriously. I mean I know you’re kidding, but I was talking with the SO the other day about this and we discussed how in this world the way it is now it may make sense to wait to get married, but maybe if people were raised to think of marriage differently they could start shifting to marrying younger (or at least be open to it if they found the right person younger and not break up just *because* they’re young).

        Oh! And a thought I forgot to add to my original comment… a really bad consequence of pushing marriage until later yet keeping it within this tiny acceptable window time-wise really puts women in a bad spot fertility wise. As in, you have between 28 and 32 to find THE ONE, otherwise, no kids for you! Great.

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      • katie

        katie March 29, 2013, 12:57 pm

        ha, im totally not kidding. it should happen. the world would be so much better, not just for marriage!

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      • LM

        LM March 29, 2013, 1:23 pm

        I think that’s where part of the problem lies… there are so many kids nowadays (and I know every generation says this) that I see trying to grow up before their time. My stepson’s girlfriend was already talking babies and marriage (in THAT order) last year and she had just turned 16. Oh, wait, you said mature, not grow up. Yes, that would solve everything.

        On the marrying young article – I didn’t much care for it. I think the majority of people have been brainwashed to think there is a certain “timeline” that must me adhered to and that’s ridiculous. But even then on that note, the article was almost irresponsible sounding. Good for the writer that has had a successful marriage of 30 years, but it doesn’t always work out the way someone hopes. as Kate said below, it’s a total crapshoot. Because of the longevity people have and just how the world is now, well, at 18, 19, 20 even to 25, a person grows and changes SO MUCH and it may not be to how the other person views it as good or how they would like their mate to be. Then again, the people involved, if they do marry young, must have a great sense of self. I think that most kids or young people that do enter into these commitments just don’t realize how much work, time, effort, self, etc. goes into a marriage.

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      • avatar

        *HmC* March 29, 2013, 2:25 pm

        I agree with you that having a great sense of self at a young age would be a major factor in whether a young marriage could work out. And the way our world is now, young marriages are not practical for a lot of reasons. I’m just opining that perhaps cultivating maturity at a younger age would help. Like you said, mature earlier, not just plunge into adult decisions earlier sans maturity.

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      • LM

        LM March 29, 2013, 2:33 pm

        Having a great sense of self would mean maturation, but I find it unfortunate that many parents don’t teach these things to their kids but let them do whatever they please and just go along with it.

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  • avatar

    Kate March 29, 2013, 12:52 pm

    I don’t know, I see the author’s points about marrying young, but it’s a total crapshoot. I got married just after I turned 21 (after Junior year in college). I did it because my HS boyfriend asked me, I’d get to live in Europe, and I wanted to be an adult and move out of my parents’ house but was too immature to do it any other way. I was too freaked out to even live in dorms in college

    Even though I was totally comfortable with my boyfriend, he was super funny, we were compatible, he treated me well, etc., he was NOT the guy for me, and I didn’t have the perspective to know it. After he got out of the military he completely crapped out, quit an awesome job, and has never worked a real job since. I outgrew him while still in my 20s and needed to move on. At 21 I didn’t know who I was, who I was going to be, what I was capable of, or what a good relationship looks like. That took me much longer to figure out.

    That said, I think some people do meet the right guy when they are quite young, and may succumb to pressure to break up with him and not settle down young. But how the hell do you know? I guess whatever age you are, if you are with a guy who makes your life better, makes you happy, you feel like there’s not someone better for you out there (NOT because you’re scared of being alone but because you truly believe no one is going to make you happier than this guy), and what you have together is *working,* then you should probably go ahead and get married and take your chances.

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    • HuggaWugga

      HuggaWugga March 29, 2013, 1:43 pm

      Thanks for adding this! Believe, I would have had no problem marrying in my early 20s if I had found the right person, but it just didn’t turn out that way. To be fair, I think I feel more pressure to get married now that I’m 30 than I ever did in my early 20s, but nothing in my life has ever really gone to plan with the timeline that I had in my head! I’m getting tired of the “just marry young” articles that are beginning to pile up–it seriously denies the amount of luck that’s involved with meeting a person that you want to marry who also wants to marry you.

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      • avatar

        Kate March 29, 2013, 1:58 pm

        Yes, agreed, you should definitely not marry whoever you’re with when you are feeling that pressure to get married if it’s a relationship that’s not truly working for you. You may not find the right guy until you’re a bit older, but I think you increase your chances greatly if you can identify when a relationship isn’t working and it’s time to move on, and *do it.* Move on. Yeah, it’s a little scary to move alone into the unknown, but now you’re available to meet another guy who might be the right one. I think a lot of us get stuck in a relationship that isn’t meeting our needs and isn’t going to, but we stick with it and try to make it work at all costs because we love the guy and want him to be right, and we’ve invested time in this, and it just has to work. No, if it’s not working, it’s not going to work. So move on. But also educate yourself about what a good relationship looks like and what you should be looking for, so you know it when you find it. Hey, you might find it at 19 and you might grow and change together, but I think that’s rather unlikely. If it doesn’t, then you have to let go of this fear that you’ll be alone and doomed, otherwise you’ll make choices from a place of fear, which is never good.

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      • Brown-eyed NoVA Girl

        Brown-eyed NoVA Girl March 29, 2013, 11:48 pm

        Amazing response,I wish you had written this last year when I was in a relationship that should have ended but didn’t because I used the logic you outlined. Yeesh

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  • CatsMeow

    CatsMeow March 29, 2013, 1:01 pm

    Hmm. I didn’t marry young because I didn’t find someone I wanted to marry who also wanted to marry me. I might not marry “old” for the same reason, haha.

    Are people breaking off relationships because they think they’re “too young” – or are couples just staying together longer before they “tie the knot”?

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    • avatar

      lemongrass March 29, 2013, 1:48 pm

      I met my husband at 19. I knew right away that it would be serious and that I would likely marry him if I continued to date him and I did wonder if I was ready to settle down and not date anymore. I wanted the freedom to live in any country or go anywhere at any time before I settled down and had kids. But this guy was perfect for me and I was falling in love. I chose him and we married when I was 22. I knew very well what my decision meant and sometimes it was hard for me that he was already settled into his career and isn’t able to move somewhere else and therefore I don’t have a say in where we live. So yes, breaking up, or I guess not letting a budding relationship continue because I was “too young” was an option for me because I knew that staying in it would restrict my freedom. But I would make the choice to be with him every day and I know that for me, it was the right choice.

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      • katie

        katie March 29, 2013, 3:16 pm

        i also think that accepting a life as you choose it is a big part of it as well. like, you could have married a guy who wanted to travel as well- that would have been a life you two chose together. or, you could have not gotten married, and accept that life however it came to you. or, like you did, accept the marriage+kids life, and go with that.

        i think a big error people make with marriage is choosing a life they dont want, or forcing a life that wont work out.

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    • avatar

      ktfran March 29, 2013, 2:05 pm

      Here, here!

      The perfect age to marry? When you meet someone you want to marry and who wants to marry you. I don’t care if you’re 19, 28, 43 or 67. I’m not so much concerned with age. I’m more concerned about the reason why. Are you doing just because you’re supposed to, or is it because you truly want to spend your life with that person? If it’s the later, I think the couple is more likely in it for the long haul.

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    • avatar

      *HmC* March 29, 2013, 2:27 pm

      I dumped a great guy after dating for 8 years (from 18-26) because I felt like 26 was too young to get married and I wanted to “sow my oats” barf gag. My life is good now but I think that doing what I did for the reasons I had was a dumb move. So that colors my perspective for sure.

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  • avatar

    GatorGirl March 29, 2013, 1:16 pm

    “SPARKLERS OR ELSE IT WASN’T REAL.” hahaha

    In all seriousness, Pinterest is ruining weddings.

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  • avatar

    Lindsay March 29, 2013, 1:42 pm

    I’m not really into this early marriage article at all. Personally, I feel like she’s one of those people who gets the “whoa, you married young” a lot and just wants to defend herself.

    Regardless, I wasn’t really under the impression that young adults were actively trying to put marriage off for the sake of marrying older. I just thought that people were focusing more on other parts of life, like careers and friends and just being happy, and not turning their early-20s into a “ring before spring” kind of thing. All of my married friends have gotten married because that’s the time at which their relationships had progressed to that point, not because they hit a certain age. I’m not married yet because I haven’t met anyone

    I wonder if maybe this lady was a little spoiled by getting a husband at 19, in that she doesn’t realize you can’t just go to the store and pick one up. I also wonder about those statistics she gives about 20-somethings drinking and being depressed. Are those comparing completely single people to marrieds, or does it also include nonmarried couples? Because even people who do put off marriage may just be pushing the date back with their partner, not just crying into a pillow alone.

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    • katie

      katie March 29, 2013, 3:20 pm

      well, in our culture there is definitely, and especially towards women, a sense of 1. go to school. 2. get a great job, achieve financial independence/security, advance quickly in job 3. find a spouse 4. have children. like, its a planned out thing and you cant deviate from it. if you do deviate, like you said, people will be like “whoa you married young” or “whoa you had a baby before/while you went to college” or whatever. its a stupid thing, it puts people into boxes that might not work out for them, it takes individual choices out of it. i dont like it.

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  • avatar

    lemongrass March 29, 2013, 2:19 pm

    Those over-the-top proposals are ridiculous. $45,000 to propose to someone you’ve been dating for “several months?” Can you spell D I V O R C E?

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    • avatar

      GatorGirl March 29, 2013, 2:25 pm

      That whole thing just grossed me out. $21,000 for a ring? A peice of JEWLERY?! No. I can get behind a $5k ring. But that’s my tops. A 2 week trip to Greece to celebrate getting engaged? Where the hell do you go for your honeymoon? The moon?

      The amount of materilism and greed and just ridiculousness in this world sickens me. Don’t get me wrong, I like a new pair of shoes and a nice mani as much as the next girl- but shit like this disgusts me.

      End rant. I need a drink.

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      • avatar

        lemongrass March 29, 2013, 2:30 pm

        That and i just can’t stand when people behave a certain way just for attention. Be it loud, cursing teenagers, ott YouTube proposals or reality tv. Whatever happened to living a regular life? It seems everybody just wants attention and will do anything for it.

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      • avatar

        ktfran March 29, 2013, 2:44 pm

        I’m so on the same page as the two of you today. And catsmeow.

        That story grossed me out too. Ridiculous!

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    • avatar

      Taylor March 29, 2013, 3:11 pm

      The picture of their post proposal smooch had ZERO heat. I know I’m being catty, but come on – you’d think any decent proposal would lead to some decent face-suckage.

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      • avatar

        GatorGirl March 29, 2013, 3:41 pm

        I was too busy crying post-proposal to make out 😉

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  • Miel

    Miel March 29, 2013, 2:26 pm

    I’m not so fond of the marrying young article either. A cornerstone and not a capstone ? Since when does my life end at the age of 30, when I have my degrees, have a good job and a place to live ? It’s not even half of my life, it still the early stages of the adult life, how is that “too old” or “too late” to begin a new stage and become somebody’s wife ? I don’t get why all the great milestones in my life should begin at 18 and finishes at 32, that’s pretty sad.

    One point I would like to bring, is the difference between marrying someone and begin a long-term relationship with someone. It’s true that during college years, it can be beneficial to go from “party-girl” to “responsible girl”, and a romantic partner might be the cause of that. But you can be in a serious relationship with someone, where you will make common decision, support each other emotionally, share some financial decision (some, not all…), share some life important decision, live together, while not be married or engaged ! What’s important is the commitment you share, in your mind, your action and your objectives, not a piece of paper that says you are married. Your partner can put you in trouble, or ignore you, or be abusive to you, or be unsupportive, or be absent, or cause you pain, even if you are married. I feel like all the beneficial part of marriage when you are still studying (not counting scholarships), without revenues, without kids or a mortgage, can all be present with a serious non-married couple.

    THEN, after you graduate, after you find a job, after you go through the best and worst days of your life next to your partner, after you are confident that in your heart and your mind, this person will be by your side for the rest of life, you might be ready for a house and kids. And at that point, yes marriage might be a great decision, because it will offer greater financial protection to your kids and your spouse if something was to happen in the future. But I don’t think most people reach that point when they are 19, and so there should be no rush to marry. Because really, why ?

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    • avatar

      Eagle Eye March 29, 2013, 3:23 pm

      This. ALL of it. I have been in LTR with my boyfriend for almost 4 years, we literally started dating right at the end of college. We have a good rule of thumb, one major life-changing decision/event at a time – based on that criteria, we just haven’t had TIME to even really sit down and think rationally about marriage on top of graduating from college, doing LDR, leaving the country, starting graduate school, the other one starting graduate school, moving in together, one of us finishing grad school, one of us questioning his entire career path, moving across the country and starting up another LDR – I love him, he’s wonderful, I deeply love our relationship, and right now, were we are works for us.

      The idea of planning a wedding literally makes me want to go out back and breathe slowly into a paper bag. I’m in no rush, he’s in no rush. We communicate about our relationship effectively….AHHHH!

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  • avatar

    SpaceySteph March 29, 2013, 1:47 pm

    I like the idea of a marriage as a cornerstone not a capstone, but I think you can still do that after graduating from college. And I’m really glad I didn’t get married while I was still in college. My senior year of Aerospace Engineering…. ooh boy. I didn’t have time to be a wife. I lived in a single, on-campus, ate pretty much entirely processed foods because I had no time to cook or eat or sleep or do laundry or tidy up. I had no time to do anything but work on my damn senior design project and go to my actual job (which, luckily I was an RA so I spent most of my time at work doing homework too) and search for a post-graduation job.
    What kind of environment is that for a new marriage? Not a good one. All of my other relationships massively suffered my last semester of college.
    I would have happily gotten married within a year out of college had I found the right person by then, but I didn’t because turns out the man I was gonna marry was already working at my future job and I had to go to my grown-up job to find him. Honestly, I think I met and married my husband with all the expediency I could muster and it was not because I was *waiting* until I had my ducks in a row that it took me until age 26 to get married.

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  • avatar

    SpaceySteph March 29, 2013, 1:51 pm

    MASON JARS!
    I think I’m the only person on the planet but I flipping hate mason jars. They are not adorable or rustic, they are ugly and the screw top lip makes me dribble. Down with mason jars.

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    • avatar

      ktfran March 29, 2013, 2:07 pm

      A agree that I don’t like mason jars to drink out of, but I will say they are handy for grab and go breakfasts. I alternate between overnight oats and steel cut oats most weeks. For both, I assemble the night before, toss it in my bag, get to work and eat breakfast when I’m ready. I like it better than plastic containers. Anyway, that’s my two cents on mason jars.

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      • avatar

        lemongrass March 29, 2013, 2:10 pm

        I own a shit ton of mason jars but I use them for their intended purpose and not at all to be cutesy.

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      • katie

        katie March 29, 2013, 3:22 pm

        i agree. mason jars are super handy and great for their intended purposes… but look pretty dumb as decor.

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    • avatar

      GatorGirl March 29, 2013, 2:20 pm

      My mom totally called me this morning as said she found like 200 mason jars and did I want them for my wedding. Hehehe. (The answer is no, not really. But it’s cheaper than buying vases since we already own them.)

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    • CatsMeow

      CatsMeow March 29, 2013, 2:36 pm

      Yeahhh what’s with the mason jar trend? I’m sick of ’em.

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    • Lindsay

      Lindsay March 30, 2013, 2:31 pm

      I actually like them. I lived in a housing co-op (OK, this is not helping my case) for a while with a bunch of other people, and we somehow acquired a bunch of them very cheaply. Anyway, I liked using them for glasses because I thought they were the perfect size and looked nice enough for very little money.

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  • avatar

    SpaceySteph March 29, 2013, 2:01 pm

    Completely OT, but when I was reading the Salon article, I saw this in the sidebar:
    http://www.slate.com/articles/life/dear_prudence/2013/03/dear_prudence_my_fianc_e_suffered_a_stroke_is_it_ok_if_i_leave_her.html

    What the hell does a proposal mean?! Seriously. When you ask someone to marry you it’s for better or FOR WORSE. If you are going to bounce the second that shit gets real, you were not ready to marry them.

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      lemongrass March 29, 2013, 2:12 pm

      I thought the same thing! I would have asked exactly what vows were you planning on saying?

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    • avatar

      GatorGirl March 29, 2013, 2:19 pm

      Fuck that guy. Seriously.

      “This has created a future that I had not envisioned nor signed up for.” It’s not the future she envisioned either asswipe. UGH. I want to punch him!

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      • avatar

        SpaceySteph March 29, 2013, 3:42 pm

        I agree. I’m really very upset about this. What a douche.

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    • avatar

      Lindsay March 29, 2013, 2:25 pm

      I KNOW. And the fact that Prudie is basically like, “Oh, this stuff is too heavy for only being together for a year.” Well, it was enough for them to get married…

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      • avatar

        SpaceySteph March 29, 2013, 2:52 pm

        EXACTLY! If you actually wanted to marry her, you’d want to at least try to stick through the tough stuff. I’m not saying that marriages wouldn’t fail over something this tough, but I damn well expect my husband to give it his best shot. Not be asking 3 months in, when can I leave?

        If you can’t handle the hard stuff, don’t get married. Which is fine, have a domestic partnership or live together without getting married. Then when the tough stuff happens, peace out if you want. Getting married is not fun and games, its for handling the hard stuff as a team.

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      • Lindsay

        Lindsay March 29, 2013, 3:16 pm

        Yeah! My friend and I read Prudie and then talk about it over gchat, and we started wondering if maybe he had started to regret moving so fast or it hadn’t really sunk in until her stroke, and maybe he was looking for an excuse. I know everyone’s different, but it seems like most people dont’ really start getting that itch to leave their ailing spouse until it’s been a really long time or they’re clearly not getting any better. They have no idea what her recovery will be like at this point.

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      rachel March 29, 2013, 3:01 pm

      I feel really bad for the guy’s kid. He’s willing to move him/her in with a new “step=mom” after *6 months* and then is happy to drop her to the curb once things get hard.

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  • avatar

    AliceInDairyland March 29, 2013, 2:44 pm

    Blargh those wedding videos are so AWKWARD and counter intuitive to me. Marriage is about a deep, steady, strong, quiet love (in my opinion) between two people and to a certain extent their families. It is not between two people, a marching band, and a flash mob and some random people. Therefore I see no reason for them to be there during the proposal. And the speech’s the guys gave just seemed so… planned and trite to me. I dunno, I am sure part of it is that I hate being the center of attention but I just think that these huge video taped engagements are irrelevant to the purpose of a proposal.

    My ideal proposal would be going somewhere important to me and my SO, or at least quiet. And then hearing from my SO what he saw in me, and what he saw in the future with us that made him excited enough and confident enough to decide to spend the rest of his life with me. And then I would like to say the same thing back. We can put a ring on it if we want, but I feel like that discussion would be the most romantic scenario in the world. No flash mob necessary.

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  • avatar

    AliceInDairyland March 29, 2013, 2:56 pm

    Oh, also I wanted to comment on the “Case for Marrying Young” thing. I think the article is both good and bad, but I definitely think it highlights a concept that I think is important. And if anyone hasn’t checked out the Knot Yet website, they should because there are some really interesting statistics… Anyways, I feel like I am somewhat of an outlier in my age group. I am 22, and happened to meet a person who I am well on the way towards marriage with. I am also non-religious and pursuing a doctorate degree. My age/education/religion bracket basically makes it unheard of for me to get married before 30 or have kids earlier than my early 30s.

    But my tentative life plan is get married around 25 and have my children done with at/around 30. And apparently the only people who do that anymore are people without a college education and/or have a strong religious upbringing. But for me, and my partner, it makes sense. I found (the seemingly) right person at 20. I will have my schooling completed/basically completed by 25 and my partner is already established in his career. I want to have children at the beginning of my career so I am maximizing my fertility, and not radically altering my career path. We are on our way to having a home next year, and although we won’t have a lot of money we are on the trajectory and certainly have enough. But I feel like a complete outcast for having these thoughts as my friends are busy planning their year teaching English abroad.

    I often think about what it would be like to be single and how that would open up a lot of opportunities for me. Like Lemongrass said, I won’t really live somewhere else exotic and far away because my SO has a career that he can’t easily pick up and move. But my fleeting desires for change don’t trump the day to day pleasures of being with someone who shares my goals, makes me laugh, and who I love dearly. So. My essay for the day.

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      *HmC* March 29, 2013, 3:11 pm

      I don’t think there is or should be one perfect cookie cutter timeline. I don’t like how we used to pressure all women to marry by 20 or they were an old maid, but I’m just not a fan of the new 28-32 super strict window either and I think it’s almost as restrictive AND bad for fertility reasons. If someone really is the right one, discarding them for the sole reason that you are too young is unwise. That is, assuming you want to get married and have kids, which is ok not to want also. If you’re happy being single forever and want to date casually then that’s a worthwhile lifestyle choice too. But, assuming you do want to marry and have a family eventually, discard the right partner at your peril. They don’t sell them at Trader Joe’s. It’s not just a matter of picking an age and ringing a bell. I think if you base your happiness on a rigid timeline, any timeline, you are setting yourself up for potential unhappiness.

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      • katie

        katie March 29, 2013, 3:27 pm

        i definitely agree that the rigid education, perfect job, find man, have babies timeline is just as bad as when women had to marry before 20 or something was wrong.

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    • Lindsay

      Lindsay March 30, 2013, 2:27 pm

      I have quite a few friends who got married around 25 or so, so I don’t find it unusual. And they also are not religious, and both had just gotten master’s degrees. Some of them did worry initially about whether they should commit so early (they also were with their first or second boyfriends), and the way you put it in your last paragraph is exactly what I tried to convey to them. (Though my argument was coming from a single person who has moved around a lot, so they were still skeptical at first.)

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  • avatar

    Sasa March 30, 2013, 7:22 am

    I think my grandparents had a marriage of the type described in the article – committing to each other in their early to mid-twenties and then growing together. It’s definitely a model that can work (it worked for them), though for me personally – the older I get, the happier I am that I didn’t marry and have children young. There are so many things I came to experience by keeping a lot of options open until now (late twenties). I only really started considering alternative lifestyles (not marrying, possibly not having children) in the last few years and I feel I really came into my own during that time – from like 26 to 29. I may still choose to marry and have children, but if I do so, it will be a much more educated choice.

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  • bittergaymark

    bittergaymark March 30, 2013, 12:22 pm

    The only people who benefit from other marrying young appear to be divorce attorneys. Seriously.

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