Dear Wendy
Dear Wendy

Friday Links: September 28

Here are a few things from around the web that may interest you:

From NYTimes: “I Was a Welfare Mother”

From Match.com: “How your career choice affects your love life”

From The Atlantic: “Not Wanting Kids Is Entirely Normal”

From CNN: “Till death of cell phone contract do us part” (What happens when you break up with someone you share a cell phone contract with?)

From The Guardian: “Creepshots and revenge porn: how paparazzi culture affects women”

From Huffington Post: “Workplace Pregnancy Bill Introduced Despite Opposition”

Thank you to those who submitted links for me to include. If you see something around the web you think DW readers would appreciate, please send me a link to [email protected] and if it’s a fit, I’ll include it in Friday’s round-up. Thanks!

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10 comments… add one
  • avatar

    kerrycontrary September 28, 2012, 1:33 pm

    I love the article from the Atlantic, it really makes you think a lot: “The results of Barber’s research showed that the children who were unintended — both those who were mistimed and those who were unwanted — got fewer parental resources than those children who were intended. Basically, children who were unplanned didn’t get as much emotional and cognitive support as children who were planned — as reported both by the researchers and the mothers themselves.”—and this is why birth control is awesome.

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  • avatar

    bethany September 28, 2012, 1:51 pm

    Re: the Workplace/Pregnancy article- How sad is it that we need a law like this to protect a pregnant woman who wants to carry water with her at work?! I mean, seriously? Sad.

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    • LM

      LM September 28, 2012, 1:56 pm

      Most employers show preference – when I was in the military and pregnant, I had to go to medical and get a note stating that I was not allowed to move heavy objects or paint because a higher up “needed” it. There was another girl that was pregnant as well and they said she didn’t have to provide a note because they didn’t “need” one for her.

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    • katie

      katie September 28, 2012, 5:36 pm

      EXACTLY what i thought when i read it!!

      we seriously have to legislate this?? some employers really dont understand that it is a temporary thing, in later months of pregnancy, and even if its the whole time, only 9 months??? seriously?? do we need to also legislate that everyone passes a biology class before they go out into the workforce??

      i just dont get it.

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  • mandalee

    mandalee September 28, 2012, 2:04 pm

    I personally loved the Welfare Mom article. My parents had me at 19 and 21, and received assistance for the first three years of my life. I was in the hospital for the first year of life and my medical bills basically bankrupted what measly savings they had. They worked their tails off and are now happily middle class and appreciate everyday the ability to get back on their feet that the assistance provided. Welfare and government assistance has such a negative vibe these days because of a few bad apples, that it’s nice people like my parents have a voice in the crowd.

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    • avatar

      Rangerchic September 28, 2012, 2:20 pm

      I liked that article too….I was in a similar situation and used some forms of welfare and went to college with the Pell grant, other grants, and loans. I now work and don’t use any assistance, pay taxes, etc. It goes to prove that if we as a society can help those that want to help themselves then more will be put back into society and everyone would be happier for it.

      And I can (yes can) believe the woman was fired from Wal-Mart. I live in Walmart country and worked for the home office for 10 months (only 10 months because I kept clashing with the culture – I quit) and they are a stickler for the rules…no (and I mean NONE whatsoever) exceptions. I think it is sad…and repulsive they did that to that woman.

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      • avatar

        ele4phant September 28, 2012, 4:02 pm

        Just out of curiosity, do you know why the policy is that cashiers can have water bottles. I don’t think its right to limit anyones – pregnant or not – access to water, so why do they prohibit most of their employees from keeping water with them.

        I’m assumming they’d also not be good if people wanted to take breaks and walk back all the way to the employee lounge to get a sip of water.

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      • avatar

        AKchic September 28, 2012, 7:36 pm

        Spillage. Having worked registers, we had to make sure that IF we had a water bottle, that if it were to be bumped over, it wouldn’t gush all over the place. Depending on how it’s knocked/fell, it could cause damage to the register, the scanner, etc and no company wants to replace their equipment. Not only that, but the issue of water getting into the product that is being purchased.

        I’m not saying it’s right, I’m just getting into the supposed logic. But, think of how many times a year we all knock over our own drinks near our computers, books, other electronics? And it gets ruined? Are you willing to replace it should you damage it? Employers don’t want to risk it in order to boost their profit margins.

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  • avatar

    Taylor September 28, 2012, 4:43 pm

    The NY Times article was POWERFUL. It makes me crazy how hateful the rhetoric surrounding welfare is, stories like her’s truly show how it’s a hand up, not a hand out.

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  • katie

    katie September 28, 2012, 5:47 pm

    all these were freaking amazing today!!

    wow. that not everyone should be parents articel…. wow. awesome.

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