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Interview Question

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This topic contains 139 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by Nookie Nookie 5 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 13 through 24 (of 140 total)
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  • #668414 Reply
    Nookie
    Nookie
    Participant

    @StaceySteph, I actually told the people interviewing me that if I came to another interview, I’d like to be in a position to be honest with my current employer as soon as possible as I really dislike being dishonest with them. Maybe too honest… But it remains that I think this must be only the second time I’ve ever interviewed for a role without first telling my employer that I was looking. Maybe not the smartest, but that’s how I roll.

    Good luck @missdre! To get a second interview, I bet you did really well. I haven’t interviewed previously for over eight years (!!!) but I do try to remind myself that while you want to impress, it’s a dialogue: they’re trying to impress you as well and want you to do well. Have a clear idea of what you want before you go in? I know I have to ask to the top end of the salary being offered, it’s actually a step down financially but hopefully the right move professionally for me

    #668416 Reply
    Nookie
    Nookie
    Participant

    Well they want me in at 4pm on Friday to meet with both directors looking for support!!!!

    #668417 Reply
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    MissDre

    I think for me, I’m mostly looking for an employer that supports a healthy work/life balance. But I don’t want to come across sounding like I don’t want to put in work. Of course I want to work hard to get my projects done.

    But I don’t like being held to strict 9-5 hours. Flexibility is important to me – i.e. coming in at 9:30 some days. I want the option to work from home some days (not all the time, but when I need to). I don’t want to feel like a dick for leaving at 5 PM when the rest of my team is sticking around til like 6 or 7 PM. I don’t want to be expected to check my work email during evenings and weekends.

    The CEO of this company is a much older man, he’s from a different generation and I hope his idea of a workday isn’t too strict. For me – my goal is to get a project done and get it done well. Not to sit in an office for exactly 8 hours because that’s what is expected.

    #668420 Reply
    Nookie
    Nookie
    Participant

    If I were you, and I’m not and I’m sure someone else will have better advise, I would phrase it as a question: Do you allow your employees flexibility in their hours as long as their performance does not suffer?

    I’d love to work from home a bit more, I do it here from time to time, but I don’t know that I could ask for it from these potential roles.

    #668421 Reply
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    MissDre

    Well I already wrote in my long ass questionnaire that I’m looking for an employer that supports a healthy work/life balance. So maybe they’ll want to discuss it more in the second interview.

    #668424 Reply
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    SLS
    Participant

    Ohhhh.. can I had a question to this thread that is interview related?? I just had the final round interview with a company yesterday that went really well! yay! So well… that they emailed this morning as they would like to check references. No one has ever checked references before (even when requested) but this company is serious about “fit” (which I admire) rather than just filling the position for convenience. I REALLY want this offer, it is my top choice from all companies I am interviewing with so I think that is why I want to make sure my references help support my application.

    Thoughts on References? From those that have actually their references checked and/or those that have checked references when filling a position.

    I am thinking of including my PhD Advisor, a work colleague and friend from my post-doc (Post-Doc advisor won’t have anything nice to say since I didn’t take the traditional tenure track faculty route). I am excluding anyone from my current company. And I stumped on my 3rd. I was thinking a fellow board member from a local organization that would be a ‘character reference’?

    #668425 Reply
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    Fyodor

    Do not EVER tell an employer about a new job until you’ve gotten an offer, made it through all the contingencies, and accepted the offer. No matter how nice your boss is. He/she might be ethically obligated to tell higher ups, who won’t be as sympathetic. He might react differently than you think.

    No one will fault you for fibbing about where you’ve been.

    Don’t bring up flexible time until after you have an offer. If you meet with non-supervisory employees you can try to tease it out of them indirectly by asking them about their schedules, workdays, etc. You don’t want to signal during your interview that you’re not 100 percent committed to being there.

    The point up to the offer is entirely about selling yourself to them. Your questions should be built around making a good impression on them and showing that you understand the job. AFTER you have an offer, ask if you can come in and meet some of the people you’d be working with. THEN you can ask some of your own questions.

    #668430 Reply
    Nookie
    Nookie
    Participant

    @sls, I used to interview for roles a long time ago. It would like kind of weird to me if you didn’t have any references from your current role, unless you hadn’t been there very long. I think I’d ask you about it in person though, and see what your answer was?

    Failing that, your other references sound pretty good! Good luck with it!

    I don’t really agree with Fyodor, if you can bring it up in the second interview and make it a plus – in that you’re committed to completing your projects in the best way possible, but you need the ability to decide the best use of your time… Well I don’t know, if it’s really that important to you isn’t it best to be on the same page before you go any further with them?

    #668437 Reply
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    MissDre

    Yeah, I think it’s better to at least get an understanding of whether a potential employer is a good fit before wasting anybody’s time, continuing with multiple interviews, etc. This is a mid-senior level position. At this point in my career, I’m not looking for a new job because I desperately need one, I’m looking for something that will be both an exciting challenge and a great fit for me personally.

    Time is money. I spent two hours in an interview with them last week and then I spent like 3 hours filling out this friggin work history questionnaire, and now I’m going in for yet another interview. I wouldn’t want to spend all that time just to find out the company doesn’t line up with my personal values.

    #668438 Reply
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    Fyodor

    Your wanting to work from home will not be seen as a plus even if they are open to letting people work from home. Bringing it up during the interview signals that you are less than enthusiastic about going along with rules/practices that you don’t feel are efficient. Employers want people who are going to be frustration free.

    There is no downside to waiting for a post offer interview/call with coworkers. If flexible work hours are absolutely a dealbreaker to you, try to bring it up in some of the more “social” interviews with people who are your peers and draw it out as indirectly as possible.

    #668441 Reply
    FireStar
    Firestar

    Also, Ms. Dre, everyone has a different definition of work life balance. They may think 9-6 IS a good balance – depending on the industry. Or they think they do when they don’t. When I was interviewing law firms for articles my firm told me they do. Invited me to speak to a woman lawyer who told me she never missed a dance recital or soccer game…yeah…after I started there turns out it was an outright lie. She had no relationship with her kids and no one dreamed of leaving their desk until well after 6 on a slow night. Fit is important. Make sure though, that the things you are asking for are offered in your industry. I’ve had employee ask for things that logistically make no sense given their position.

    #668443 Reply
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    MissDre
    Participant

    @firestar yes – lots of companies are very flexible in my industry. I don’t have the type of job where I have to deal with clients. I’m a strategist, so most of my work is done behind the scenes. Deadlines? Of course, absolutely important.

    Anyway, in the previous job I interviewed for (the one I really want) I talked about these things with the manager. He told me he doesn’t give a shit when anybody comes and goes. His words were “I’m not anybody’s babysitter, as long as you get your projects done on time and done well that’s all I care about.” Which is how it should be, in my opinion.

    Anyway, I’m still hoping I’ll get an offer from that company before the end of the month, as that’s the job I want. We’ve been in touch regularly, so things are looking positive. Just slow.

    Anyway, sorry to threadjack Nookie! Good luck!!!!!!

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