Dear Wendy
Dear Wendy

My puppy is 10 today!

Home Forums General Chat My puppy is 10 today!

This topic contains 9 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by avatar Janelle 4 months ago.

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  • #694043 Reply
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    Janelle

    A random share because he is the best. Today is my puppies (he is still a puppy to me) 10th birthday! I cannot believe he is 10, he still looks and acts like a puppy, minus chewing every cord he can find…and some drywall. Ugh.

    I am not crazy enough to have a dog party but he for sure is getting some special treats today! Thanks to my little buddy for being my best friend these past 10 years!

    It also is making me a bit sad because I know we are getting up there in dog years. I cannot imagine life without him.

    #694734 Reply

    Aww, I’m glad your puppy had a good birthday.

    #694988 Reply
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    Fyodor

    Pictures…

    #695154 Reply
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    Janelle

    I don’t know how to do pics on here. Maybe I need to create the special Instagram account. He is such a cutie.

    #696465 Reply
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    Janelle

    Omg guys. I am shaking. Let the dog into the backyard and was in the kitchen making coffee. I look at the window and a coyote is about 5 feet away from him just staring. I shriek “oh my god!” and the man looks up and sees what’s I see. We both run outside. Once the coyote was startled by us he ran but ended up running close to the dog (he was on the other side of the 3 foot fence right behind where my dog was). The man snatched the dog up and we ran into the house. The coyote finally ran off.

    I am sure I did something wrong, shouldn’t startle him or something but we just reacted. Luckily nothing happened but how scary. Growing up in socal coyotes are a part of life, they sometimes are on my porch, but I’ve never been this close to disaster. Puppy won’t be outside without me close to him again, especially dusk and dawn which is when they hunt.

    #696474 Reply
    Copa
    Copa
    Participant

    Yeah, that would scare me, too. We apparently get coyotes where I am (major midwestern city) Sometimes they show up in broad daylight near our lakeshore parks, and I’ve seen photos of them interacting with off-leash park goers’ dogs.

    Remember back when Jessica and Nick were Newlyweds? And Nick got Jessica a little Maltese puppy? I remember reading about how that puppy was outside playing and taken by a bird of prey. And something similar once happened to an old co-worker’s neighbor’s black lab puppy. That’d be such a sad way for a pet to go.

    In any case, I don’t think you did anything wrong, but it’s always good to keep an eye on your little flufferpoo.

    #696478 Reply
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    Janelle

    @copa I was thinking of the Jessica and Nick puppy after this happened. I’d be so devastated. He doesn’t really free roam the backyard as he won’t go far from my side but first thing I’ll let him out and he will spend a few mins hanging out. From now on I’m by his side though. I also intend to google how to approach that situation. I feel knowing to go slow or scare them or whatever would keep me a bit more calm should I encounter it again, and around here it’s likely.

    #696479 Reply
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    Fyodor

    Coyotes are really scary. I was at ACME last week and there was this frazzled looking coyote buying all sorts of bombs and stuff.

    #696482 Reply
    TheLadyE
    TheLadyE

    My little girl is 5lbs of black poodle fluff and she is never outside without a leash or without me. Literally never. Too many predators.

    I’m so glad your pup is ok!!

    #696533 Reply
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    Janelle

    So I looked this up today: I
    Copied and pasted on my phone so errors I apologize for. Just seemed like a good idea to post since I brought it up. It seems like I didn’t do too bad although how close I was to him when my baby was grabbed was kind of crazy. I realize I could have put myself in a lot of danger as he didn’t move away. The coyotes around here are abundant and very used to humans close by, which is very scary.

    Coyotes are naturally timid animals and will usually flee at the sight of a human. If they linger or approach, it’s time to begin “hazing.” This is a term applied to the following actions that can be taken to scare coyotes and chase them away:

    Be as big and loud as possible. Do not run or turn your back.
    Wave your arms, clap your hands, and shout in an authoritative voice.
    Make noise by banging pots and pans or using an air horn or whistle.
    Throw small stones, sticks, tennis balls or anything else you can lay your hands on. Remember the intent is to scare and not to injure.
    Spray with a hose, if available, or a squirt gun filled with water and vinegar.
    Shake or throw a “coyote shaker”—a soda can filled with pennies or pebbles and sealed with duct tape.
    The effects of hazing may not last unless all food attractants are permanently removed. This information should be shared with neighbors, friends and homeowner’s associations since hazing is most effective when the entire neighborhood is working together.

    Hazing should never be attempted if the coyote is accompanied by pups or appears to be sick or injured.

    …failing to respond to hazing

    Some coyotes may freeze and stare, or run a short distance and stop. Hazing should be continued until the coyote gets the message and finally leaves the scene. Hazing can work whether the encounter is with a lone coyote or a small pack. If the leader retreats, the rest of the pack will follow. If the coyote refuses to retreat or returns to the area despite persistent hazing, it may be due to the fact that someone is feeding coyotes nearby. This is a cause for concern and should be reported to the local police or animal control officer.

    …approaching a pet or a child

    Small pets and children should never be left unattended, and dogs should always be walked on a leash. Problems are more likely to occur when the animal is out of the owner’s control. It can also be helpful to carry a noisemaker, squirt gun or pepper spray. If a coyote approaches, pick up the pet or child, then start hazing. If the coyote does not leave, back away slowly while continuing to haze and go indoors if possible. Any aggressive behavior should be reported to the local police or animal control.

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