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Poorly timed promotion

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This topic contains 32 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by avatar dinoceros 3 days, 11 hours ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 25 through 33 (of 33 total)
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  • #682859 Reply
    TheLadyE
    TheLadyE

    I did that to a certain extent at my current company (believed what they said about “we are family” and that they had my best interests at heart) and invested wayyy too much of myself emotionally as well as my time and energy. Then last year, I was falsely accused of something I didn’t do and taken to task for it, while in the middle of being underpaid and doing the job of 2 people for the past year. In that time I’ve watched very loyal and well-producing people be out of a job in the blink of an eye because the company went in a different business strategy direction than their position allowed.

    We’re not family. It’s business. And I agree: NEVER tell a manager or a job that you’re looking.

    #682861 Reply
    avatar
    ele4phant

    Could you resign your lease next winter? So, take the job now, and then decide at six months in that position if you like it enough to stay longer, or if you still want to leave in Spring of 2018.

    It is unfortunate I guess, if you have to decide now, but I’d still take it, if it were me.

    #682869 Reply
    Copa
    Copa
    Participant

    Take the job! For reasons others have said — it’s just business, and you gotta look out for number one! — and also because I feel like you just never know what’s going to happen, right? Maybe you want to leave in a year but will love the job and change your mind. Maybe you’ll hate it so much you leave in six months. Maybe you’ll want to leave in a year but realize, like I did, that it’s actually quite difficult to truly plan when your next opportunity will actually be available to you. I knew my last job was a big mistake soon after starting, and left a few weeks ago — at about 11 months. I never, ever thought I’d leave a job so quickly, but my supervisor was a jerk and the company’s MO was to work everyone to the point of burnout. I tried to time my job search so that I’d be able to leave at or soon after the year mark. The company I’m at now moved relatively quickly with the hiring process. Another company I interviewed with, where I ultimately withdrew from the interview process, took five months from the point of application to the point where I was a finalist. Point being, I didn’t have full control over when I got an offer I wanted to accept.

    I know you mentioned you have a lease to deal with — is month-to-month an option if you’ve been leasing with the same company for awhile? That would give you the flexibility you’d need to leave whenever, I imagine.

    Also, I agree that the general rule of thumb is to NEVER tell your employers when you’re looking. But, Ask A Manager actually writes that if it’s common where you work or in your field, it’s not a bad idea. (She herself is a manager who encourages employees to let her know when they’re thinking about moving on.) I don’t know that I’d ever feel comfortable enough to do so, but if it’s common in your field/workplace, I’d at least consider it. I actually think it’d be great for everyone involved if that much candor was the norm.

    #682872 Reply
    avatar
    dinoceros
    Member

    My lease is up next in May 2018 (I had to re-sign in March). I could do a six-month lease at that time if I was unsure about how much time to stay. I’ve heard from the leasing manager that month-to-month is fairly expensive, but they also do month-extensions or short leases like 3 months, if I was searching and worried about not finding something before I had to move out.

    It’s a good point that I don’t know what will happen. I mean, I came into this job unsure if I could make it a year, and I have been planning on 3 years now, so circumstances do change!

    #682881 Reply
    avatar
    TheHizzy

    I tried to work with my complex of 5 years on breaking a lease – nope. Looking out for #1. Their company.

    #682886 Reply
    Copa
    Copa
    Participant

    When I moved states a couple years ago, I was prepared to shell out the money to break my lease. I spoke with my landlord and he agreed to let me out of the lease. It was an unexpected surprise. But I think when a physical move is required for career purposes, it may be easiest to plan like you’ll have to break the lease.

    @thehizzy – Isn’t there anything in your agreement about breaking the lease?

    #682889 Reply
    avatar
    TheHizzy

    @copa I had 2 options on breaking it so I’ve already submitted it. A house purchase happened about two months earlier than expected. It’s a pretty competitive market here and I hit a killer deal. So I’m paying a couple thousand to break my lease. I looked and it’s already listed for rent and they’ve upped the rent by like $300.

    #682891 Reply
    avatar
    TheHizzy

    @Copa I had better luck when I was moving across country and my landlord lived down the road from an old friend. I now rent from a giant company.

    #682896 Reply
    avatar
    dinoceros
    Member

    It would definitely be good to check! But my apartment complex was bought out by a corporation shortly before I moved there, so I have a feeling they aren’t too lenient. They accidentally asked me for extra rent money in my first month, I overpaid (rent, deposit and stuff were all wrapped up together), and it took 6 months to clear it up, simply because all transactions had to go through corporate. The people in the office here were just as frustrated as I was. But I relentlessly sought that $13 like it was gold. For whatever reason, they gave me an extra $5.

    My old landlord, who was just a random guy renting homes, let us move out early with just an extra month’s rent because he was able to find a new tenant. Benefit of having a individual and not a company!

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