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Dear Wendy

travel or settle down?

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This topic contains 25 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by avatar Kate 2 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 26 total)
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  • #684160
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    shorttermnomad

    I’m almost in my mid 30s and having just finished another contracted role at home (in London) about 6 weeks ago I’m out of work now. I’ve been in this position many times before. Right now I’m trying to make a decision whether to stay in London and keep looking for work or go to a part of the world for 2-3 months that’s been on my heart and mind (S America). Having had four interviews in the past 6 weeks, all of which I felt I did well in but still no success for my effort despite coming very close to getting one of them, I was second choice (the one role I was very keen on). So I could just stay here and keep looking for work but to be honest my confidence is dented a bit after these setbacks. I feel I’m not as motivated after being unsuccessful.

    Why I’m hesitating though is because I’m afraid to have another break without working. I don’t want to harm my job prospects by having too many gaps. I guess it’s the usual concern of then finding work when I get back As I said I’m not a teacher or doctor or engineer where I could just walk into a job within a week. I’ve just done temp/contract positions for the civil service and some private organisations. At this age and stage of my life the feeling that I need to settle down with a permanent job/career, family etc. is obvious. Yet I have none of those things, no responsibilities as such. Here’s the thing though – I DO WANT those responsibilities but life for various reasons that hasn’t quite worked out for me in that way Been unlucky with love, not successful with pursuing a career. So what more can I do? I have emphasised on my CV that I am seeking a permanent job so at least it conveys the message that I am hard-working and determined to commit.

    So I guess I’m wondering what are my options? I feel I need to look elsewhere and think about doing something completely different but just not sure what and at my age I feel time is running out.

    #684166
    juliecatharine
    Juliecatharine

    I don’t think putting a desire for a permanent position on your CV conveys that you are much of anything. If you want permanence and stability you need to give longer than six weeks to your job search. Honestly that’s nothing and I don’t know what world you live in but doctors and teachers don’t land jobs in a week. That timeframe is for like foodservice and retail *if you’re lucky*. Four interviews in six weeks is great though so you’re obviously doing something right. You don’t say what you do so I have no idea if remote work is an option or if travel in any way helps build your skill set. Ask a manager might have some good insights on moving from contract to permanent positions. If what you really want is a full time job you should postpone an extended trip.

    #684167
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    Janelle

    I agree with above but in my opinion a gap (not huge though) on your resume to travel is not a big deal and in fact can be helpful. It gives you experience in new cultures and when the interviewer inquires is a great way to open a conversation. There is nothing wrong with happening to find the opportunity to travel and taking it. Most wish they had the option.

    #684168
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    shorttermnomad

    Hi thanks for the response. Yeah I guess I’ve edited my CV and just stated the reasons for leaving each of the roles I’ve had.
    Sure I understand it takes longer than 6 weeks to find something that’s suitable and permanent but I think the issue for me is to do with figuring out what I really want to do. That is something I’ve never been able to figure out.
    My work has been mainly in the government (civil service) and a few smaller organisations.

    #684171
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    Janelle

    Is it common in your industry to mention on your CV why you left? I have never seen that and only had it come up as a question during an interview.

    #684172
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    Janelle

    Oh except the one resume i received where the guy said he quit because his boss was sleeping with his wife and so “f!$k that bitch”. 😂 Wish I had kept a copy of that.

    #684176
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    dinoceros
    Member

    I’ve never seen anyone list the reasons why they left a position. Generally, your CV or resume is just to list your education, jobs, and skills (some fields have more stuff, like publications). But putting more information than request risks people writing you off early. If I got a resume where someone listed their reasons for leaving, I would think they were very strange. Perhaps explaining why you are currently looking for a job, in an interview, makes sense but otherwise you’re giving them way more information that can be used again you. I would never have any idea why a candidate left a job two jobs ago and wouldn’t care, but if they brought it up, I’d still hold it against them if it was a reason that I didn’t like. Don’t overshare information that could harm your first impression.

    Of course, if that’s common in your field in your country, then that’s fine. I’m just not familiar with it.

    I would also agree that it seems early to throw in the towel. I also wonder if it’s actually all or nothing? When you have a job and income, presumably you can take vacations to South America? Not that you can’t just travel now, but I think it would work out better if you had actually decided that’s what you wanted and had time to plan a little bit.

    #684179
    bittergaymark
    bittergaymark

    Travel. Travel. Travel.
    .
    The boring pointlessness of the 9 to 5 work world isn’t going anywhere. Travel now while you have the youth and the freedom. Take a break. Enjoy life. Nobody on their fucking death bed ever says I wish I had spent MORE time making OTHER people money.

    #684259
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    FannyBrice

    I agree 1000% with BGM!! Go!! If you have the means, the opportunity, and the ability to travel, do it. You’re in your early to mid 30s so you have approximately 30-40yrs of working for other people, being tied down by other responsibilities, and regretting all the trips you did not take ahead of you. GO. Learn Spanish or Portuguese while you’re there if you feel like you need to be productive while you’re doing it. But go!!

    #684338
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    LisforLeslie

    Go travel – when you decide to return and look for a permanent position you can easily outline your decision and the gap in work history with a line or two in your cover letter.

    #684379
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    Ange

    I have to move a lot so i often have gaps in my resume, or jobs that look like they didn’t last very long. I always had an answer prepared if it was brought up but I never drew attention to it and nobody ever asked. I really don’t know how much attention people pay to it to be honest.

    #684385
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    Angel

    It sounds like you have these large gaps between jobs often, I’m not sure what you do but if that is normal for your occupation and you have the finances to travel then do it.

    You mentioned you also think you should settle down with a permanent job and a family. Your over 30 you’ve spent the past 12+ years presumably living this way, if you really want to settle down its time to take action. If it’s not then own it, determine what you want out of your future a permanent job, house, spouse, and kids isn’t the only happily ever after available. But at some point in life we start loosing options so make sure the choice is yours.

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