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Dear Wendy

26 with strict parent and help/advice

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  • #962528 Reply
    avatarM
    Guest

    Kate, that situation is common in the US, but OP says that she has graduated with a Master’s degree. If in the US, that degree program would have been in English with rare exception, and her language does not reflect that. I think it was fair to assume that she might be in a different country where the above-listed resources are not available.

    #962529 Reply
    avatarAllornone
    Guest

    I’m not sure what you mean, M. You can get a Master’s in any educational subject. Heck, I have an M.A. (Master’s of Arts) in Grant Writing and Management Evaluation (I know, who knew that existed?). I was under the impression that M.S.’s (Master’s of Science) where more common (and more lucrative) and they usually have nothing to do with English.

    #962530 Reply
    avatarKate
    Keymaster

    Wait, what? Her written English on an advice forum is not American enough to have graduated from a master’s program in the US? No way. BS.

    Her English is fine. Furthermore, there were all kinds of foreign students in my Market Research and computer science grad level classes (including business writing) who would sound less “American” to you than this LW and graduated from the same programs I did.

    It’s weird to me to assume that someone whose English isn’t perfect isn’t in the US. Or couldn’t get a master’s here, jeez.

    #962533 Reply
    avatarLisforLeslie
    Guest

    Master of Science here – I’m not saying I had no papers or writing assignments when I got my MS but if there were, they were largely technical, fairly short and rarely described my life or experiences. Outlining decision making theory and then the complex calculations to assess employment openings, assess employee skills and pay levels required a completely different language than my feelings.

    Also, in most Masters programs almost every class is group work, so someone else can help with linguistic, vocabulary and grammar issues.

    #962547 Reply
    avatarktfran
    Participant

    I work for an engineering firm with a lot of heavily degreed, intelligent people. Many write horribly. I get paid to edit their writing. A few hours ago, I had to finish incomplete sentences in a proposal that was sent to me for review. Journalism or English majors end up in my field precisely because people need help writing their thoughts clearly and concisely.

    #962554 Reply
    avatarFyodor
    Guest

    Anyone who has taken a recitation section in the sciences taught by a foreign graduate student would be pretty surprised to that assessment of the English skills needed to get a graduate degree.

    #962555 Reply
    avatarCopa
    Participant

    Some of these comments and assumptions are odd. I was born in the U.S. My mom is a non-native English speaker from a Spanish-speaking country. I learned English and Spanish at the same time as a kid. My mom was a SAHM, so we mostly spoke Spanish at home when I was young. The longer my sister and I were in school, though, the more we preferred English. Speaking another language at home — even in the U.S. — is common.

    And yeah, I work with attorneys. Part of my job entails editing their writing and ghost writing, and many are absolutely awful writers even though its a field that requires a fair amount of writing. When I was in law school, we were required to pass a basic grammar/writing test and our first shot at doing so was at orientation. A relatively small chunk of us passed on the first try. For those who had to retake at a later date, the school brought in a middle school teacher to re-teach the basics. This was a group of smart, educated 20-somethings. My sister has a master’s degree and is a terrible writer. Then again, she’s an architect and doesn’t have to be a gifted writer to do her job well.

    #962556 Reply
    avatarKate
    Keymaster

    It’s odd, and it’s also rude to ask someone if English is their second language, challenging their assertion that they have an education.

    #962557 Reply
    avatarBittergaymark
    Guest

    Eh, it also read very English as a second language to me. Like somebody who lived in a conservative foreign country or something and knew English quite well but had had little practice.

    🤷‍♂️

    I guess the fact that so many highly paid US professionals are barely literate shouldn’t surprise me.

    But it does.

    Oh, well. Who cares. America is about to Fall anyway. Bye, bye Baby.

    I am about to return to LA where I will commence emptying out my apartment. Frankly, putting 25 years of one’s adult life into trashbags is a pretty daunting task. Somebody will have a real mid century modern field day at Goodwill, I guess. I hope. Whatever. It is what it is.

    #962558 Reply
    avatarKate
    Keymaster

    ESL doesn’t mean uneducated. Or unprofessional.

    #962562 Reply
    avatarBittergaymark
    Guest

    At any rate, I didn’t think this letter writer resided in the US. That’s all I was saying. It just doesn’t read that way. Grammar, word choices, lack of slang, and culture / everybody living with their strict parents, etc.

    But I could be wrong.

    #962564 Reply
    avatarKate
    Keymaster

    You are wrong, she lives in the US.

    It’s not a problem to think she sounds like she lives elsewhere. It’s a problem to assume she couldn’t have a Master’s degree from a US school because she doesn’t sound “American.” And challenge her on her claim that she has a master’s because of her English. That makes no sense and is offensive.

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