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Blindsided by new job: over time hours

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Viewing 9 posts - 13 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #865569
    avatarbrise
    Guest

    Yeah, you were right to refuse. It would have been more diplomatic to say that you are not aware of this task as your boss didn’t tell you anything and then you go out, rather than start a confrontation with a receptionist. As long as the boss you report to didn’t actually order you to do it, you are not supposed to do it. Now, don’t do it unless you are ordered to by your boss (the one you report to). If they order it, then negociate and say that this day and that day, you can’t, impossible, for such and such reason which remains vague but imperative, and accept for one single day per week. Kate’s remark about the risk you take being alone (as a woman?) there the evening (late?) is also something you can use to make your point. You don’t want to be assaulted in the parking by night.
    Are the late hours more expensive in terms of income (legally)? You can also ask this question and request for compensation if this is more than one day per week. Don’t think that bosses like doormats (I say this having managed a 50 people department). They like teamplayers, but they also like to deal with people who have self-respect and know how to discuss without losing their temper, and make their point. They won’t fire you because of this, but you won’t win anything in doing the bad job that nobody wants to do. So limit the impact as much as possible by a negociation or by playing the surprise and ask questions about what the others will do for this problem (that is: share the chore). Asking questions is always a good way to propose other options without bluntly refusing. Good luck, that sucks.

    #866031
    avatarKate
    Guest

    This is the original poster. I was able to talk to my boss who basically said that I was not assigned to open or close the building so this was not my shift and not expected of me. So, yes, basically the receptionist tried to hoist her job onto me. I WILL be watching my back with her here on out…that was a crummy thing to pull and clearly she felt that her boss would support her doing that to me. Our confrontation was not unprofessional but it was uncomfortable and stressed. Because she blindsided me.

    My boss supported me and that made me feel good, still I wish this didn’t happen, it makes me completely distrust the receptionist now. I want to be a team player and told me boss I could at times stay late to close, but I was not open to doing it nightly nor changing my shift to a later one every day. Yes, everyone else is saying “no” to doing it, so, the receptionist is left to do it. So. I will stick with having other commitments like they do. Thanks allot everyone, your help is appreciated.

    #866110
    avatarLisforLeslie
    Guest

    Good for you! Thanks for coming back to give the update.

    Definitely watch your back with the receptionist. Consider bringing in muffins or bagels on occasion, ask her which one she likes and then put it to the side for her. That way it’s not a grovel-y kind of kindness but a “sucks to be you but here’s your muffin” kind of kindness.

    #866288
    avatarArtsyGirl
    Guest

    Eek what a crappy thing for the receptionist and her boss to do to you. It sounds like she set it up to confront you when your boss was out of the office in order to pressure you into it – banking on your inexperience and lack of immediate support. To CYA I would send an email to your boss laying out that it is not your job to close up the office and request a response so you have documentary proof. If you have an HR department, I would also make a brief stop by to appraise them on what happened. Hopefully it will blow over but it is possible that the receptionist will try to retaliate.

    #866290
    avatarKate
    Keymaster

    I would honestly not do either of those things, I think they’re more aggressive/escalated than the situation warrants. A conversation with the boss was all that was needed.

    #866311
    avatarArtsyGirl
    Guest

    Katie- normally I would agree except the receptionist clearly timed it so that the LW would not be able to consult with her boss. She also added pressure by having another manager step in. It sounds like this was a prolonged conversation even after the LW refused and said she had to confirm with her boss which worries me that the recptionist might continue to push the LW to take over closing. An email and a brief, informal update with HR stating that her scheduled hours do not cover closing ensures that she wont be put in this position again.

    #866312
    avatarJustguesting
    Guest

    Glad for the update! All I wanted to chip in was that red flags went off for me. First, it’s a liability thing. I would be really firm on getting proper training that isn’t after hours. (!!!) Safety stuff is important to think about. I may not know who is in the building , so to keep myself safe I wouldn’t be interested until documented safety training for doors and windows and obscure places depending on layout and insurance talks, teams of 2, security, whatever etc. I’ve held firm in similar situations and when the words safety and liability come up that can chill the situation. If anything went wrong, whether my fault or not, I’d be responsible and the one to blame… Plus only being there 2 months you’d be an easy scapegoat, after all youre the new guy! You totally made the right choice here.
    So glad u held firm, regardless of interest or scheduling or whatever. None of that matters really, because regardless you were not supposed to lock up and you knew that.
    I’M sure someone can word this all better than me. Hopefully my point comes across.

    #866313
    avatarKate
    Keymaster

    Yeah, I get that, Artsygirl, but people pull crap like that all the time, and you can’t go to HR for everything, they’re not your friend. You should work it out with your boss and make sure they have your back, and it doesn’t need to go any further.

    I would have (if I could think quickly enough) just said I had to be somewhere that night. Or said I really can’t because I haven’t been trained how to do that and there’s liability. NOT worth getting into a pissing contest with a receptionist over what’s my job and what’s not. And then just straightened it out with my boss the next day.

    #866314
    avatarJustguesting
    Guest

    Oh forgot that receptionist’s boss also was involved… Hope that boss person somehow gets the memo it was Not Okay and won’t happen again, to anyone ever. Sorry u gotta watch your back. It’s probably not practical to go above receptionist’s boss to make sure said boss is firmly informed of lockup policies. Doesn’t sound like any dicipline, just a clear plan here out?

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