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Stuck with school and thus my future

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This topic contains 37 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by avatar cdobbs71 1 week, 1 day ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 13 through 24 (of 38 total)
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  • #830502 Reply
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    Alexander Walker

    @Ruby_Tuesday
    I’m not sure how that would play out with both of my teachers working for the school system in question, also I know that a proper diagnosis would give me my IEP back. I’m most concerned about the ACT that I’m taking in 10 days, granted I can retake it, but knowing that I could have 30 extra minutes per-section to answer is just crazy to me.

    #830503 Reply
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    Alexander Walker

    @fyodor
    I wondered if when I was younger I just did stupid things and that I’m not dyslexic, I just took a test like online just to see, it came up when I was looking for where I could get tested. The test was scarily accurate in describing literally ME and MY childhood omg. I will 100% go see my doctor and ask them to refer me to someone who can do a whole test.

    #830512 Reply
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    JD
    Member

    I’m wondering also about a doctor saying it’s dislexia and not giving you a diagnosis. Go to another doctor. Your school likely has a free facility for students.

    #830513 Reply
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    Diana

    This was me in high school and college. I would procrastinate on almost everything and i felt like a lazy failure most of the time. I still got the work done. I would just, like you, do it all at the last minute. There were times when I got really into something and put the effort in. But that was usually something I was passionate about so the motivation was there enough for me to do it. I’m not really sure why I was such a chronic procrastinator. I can tell you that I got a lot better over the years. I have had my own business for 7 years now.I have to keep track of a lot of things and do many administrative tasks that are just boring. but I force myself into a schedule that keeps me focused.
    With that said, definitely check with a doctor and get a proper diagnosis if you can. I didn’t. Maybe if had, It might have helped me sooner.
    Secondly don’t rely on internet tests. They are mostly bulshit and will only cause you more confusion.
    I believe what helped me in particularly tough days was breaking things down into smaller tasks. Work on X for 20 minutes, take a break, work another 20, than take another break and so on.
    The biggest motivator is that I have to pay my bills now. If tasks don’t get done, I can’t pay my rent or buy food. You don’t have real adult consequences weighing over your head right now. You live at home and have your basic needs met by others. And part of you knows that. That is why you can kind of brush off homework.

    #830515 Reply
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    Diana

    You mentioned they you are fine at your jobs or when you working on something you love. It seems to me like you are just bored at school. Not sure how you can change your excitement level for standardized tests. I did horribly on the tests myself because I didn’t study and thought it was a waste of time. Still went to college and get a B.A.
    Don’t get me wrong. You should still try and make an effort with your studies. I’m working as a creative so for me grades were not super crucial to my success. What I’m saying is, if you fail sometimes in school, it’s not the end of the world.

    #830517 Reply
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    LisforLeslie

    But this will be a pattern for life (believe me, I am a procrastinator extraordinaire). It limits you. It has impacts.

    Figure out how to get your shit together now. Don’t rely on other people to kick you in the ass. Otherwise you’ll be working your 9-5 as a 9-10 pm or a 9-6 with time on the weekends to catch up when you get older.

    #830518 Reply
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    Diana

    @LisforLeslie I agree. I wish I had knewn the things I know now. I still have procrastination tendencies. But I have trained myself to override them, for the most part. It takes lots of practice in self-discipline.

    #830519 Reply
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    Kate

    It does have major impacts. Thinking about my friend I mentioned earlier, like I said she drove everyone crazy at work, including me, by not having anything done before the deadline, staying up all night and being wrecked the next day. And what she’ll do is choose to get completely focused and immersed in something else that’s not important or necessary instead of what she’s supposed to be doing. Which aggravates people even more. Honestly, she lost two jobs in a row because of this. For the last couple years she’s been working on starting a business, but then she gets distracted by something and focuses on that instead, so the business isn’t off the ground.

    You don’t want to be like that. I’m not discounting that you have a learning disability, but I don’t think it’s what’s causing this. Again, I think it’s a personality thing. But if you tackle it NOW and learn the skills to work around it or past it, you could save yourself and everyone else so much grief.

    #830522 Reply
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    MaltaKano

    LW to your question – As a big fan of therapy myself, I certainly don’t think it would hurt to consult a therapist! Building some coping skills through cognitive-behavioral therapy to notice when you’re avoiding, assess the root causes of the behavior, and work through them might make a huge difference. It could be any number of things causing this, but I still suspect it’s emotionally rooted, not primarily a learning disorder issue. Unfortunately you can get really good at avoidance on a college campus – so many distractions! – so I agree you want to figure this out now.

    #830523 Reply
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    Essie
    Participant

    I know I shouldn’t be diagnosing people (but I will anyway)…this sounds like possible adult ADD to me. Because you remind me of a guy I once knew, who could focus on things he wanted to do, but the uninteresting things that he had to do? Forget it. He had a laser-like focus on his hobbies, or anything he was interested in at that moment. Work? Chores at home? Things like doing his taxes, paying bills, etc? He’d either procrastinate to the point of creating a huge stressful mess, or just not do it at all.

    You can get screened for adult ADD, and there are treatments for it. You can be taught to manage and work around your tendency to procrastinate. Some people are helped with medication, some can do very well with techniques to help them manage their time.

    #830553 Reply
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    Odie

    What about a 504 plan? It’s not diagnosis specific and is a step down from an IEP.
    What about writing out a to do list?

    #830555 Reply
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    SpaceySteph
    Participant

    This doctor sounds like a buffoon. Time for a second opinion. Find a doctor that is willing to write down a diagnosis (whatever the diagnosis is, don’t seek a Dr that will just write whatever you say seek one that will evaluate, diagnose, and treat you) and give you the opportunity to get help for your disability rather than act like you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps. Help might include therapy/coaching, medication, and an IEP depending on what you are ultimately diagnosed with.
    Also I would say go see the Dr without getting your parents involved. Its possible that they’re the ones who wanted to suppress the diagnosis, not the Dr– unfortunately lots of people don’t believe dyslexia and ADD are real conditions and they don’t want to get their kids the help they need. You are in college now, you’re a legal adult, so you don’t need their consent for treatment.

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